White’s Guide to Collecting Figures, Number 19, July 1996

A collector’s magazine, popular in the 90s. I picked it up at a used bookstore in Texas for $1.99. It has everything from prices for figures to a tutorial on how to customize your own action figures.

If you know more the history of White’s Guide to Collecting Figures, let me know. While I can find copies for sale everywhere online, I can’t find out a lot about the magazine itself. According to saved captures on Wayback Machine, the White’s Guide website, as referenced in the magazine, wwcd.com seems to have stopped being updated in 2001 and begins redirecting to collectingchannel.com in late 2003. The website went down all together 2007-2014 and the URLs were then purchased by other companies.

Click the first image to open the gallery carousel and zoom in to read.

Continue reading “White’s Guide to Collecting Figures, Number 19, July 1996”

The Dolls of Welcome to Marwen

Some of you lovely people found my blog searching for what kind of figures were used in the movie Welcome to Marwen. But to yours, and my disappointment, I didn’t have any info about that topic here at all. So, today I’m fixing that!

The Mark Hogancamp in the fictional framework of Welcome to Marwen collects female Glaminista dolls and articulated, collectible military figures.

Glaminista is a fake brand created for the movie, however, there are very similar brands in real life.Continue reading “The Dolls of Welcome to Marwen”

1:18 Scale Magic

Some toy photographers and collectors are so specific about what scales they’ll purchase, but I can’t settle for the life of me. I choose what I feel illustrates my ideas best and that switches between 2cm tall HO scale, to 1:12 scale dollhouses to 1:18 scale action figures and everything in between.

My boyfriend recently bought me the most stunning 1:18 scale RV and I plan to take so many more photos with it. Inside, the chairs move and cabinets open and it even comes with little detachable bikes.

The top detached and used as a background prop.
Through the front windshield.

And while there’s so much more I can talk about in this scale, I’m here to talk about the magic of Lundy. I don’t own any, but I’ve often admired it, and for some reason it just feels so genuine and pure.

Lundy is a Swedish company, so just think Ikea, but tiny. They’ve been in the dollhouse business since 1945 and really know their stuff. In 1967 they won the Best Toy award from the Swedish Toy Merchants Association. They were also the very first dollhouses to have electricity.

While I could talk about how terrible the dolls look, with poorly formed neck attachments and eyes that are too far apart, I really just want to talk about how beautiful the design, furniture and accessories are, and how I often wonder if I could fit a fully armored Acid Rain action figure (like those pictured above) in those little chairs.

from Lundby.com

My absolute favorite accessory sets, just from online perusing are this armchair, bathroom and aquarium. The fabric selection for that chair is just perfect, and truly no where can you find a modern dollhouse shower. The shower being one of my favorite places in my home, always seems like an important thing to portray in miniature. And well, a miniature aquarium with tiny little fish is good enough on it’s own, but I love how many of the accessory sets come with tiny paintings that are miniaturized versions by Lisa Rinnevuo

Lundby has remained true to its scale throughout the years, meaning it’s vintage stuff, which is just as cute, can fit in with all the new if you’d like.

Find this set here.

I also think, in coming off of my Kid’s Dollhouse Trends post, that lundby houses, while smaller than the traditional 1:12 scale are a good balance of aesthetic. They’re made for children and have a clean modern design, but don’t insist on minimalism and pastel colors. They’re homey without clutter.