Tourmaline .

Miniature Diorama Photographer

Posts from the ‘Books & Movies’ category

Some Things Never Change (or Paper Crafting Books Will Never Not be Cool)

I bought some things Friday and Saturday and I keep thinking how proud my child self would be with me. That’s to say, I’m very happy with my purchases, and they aren’t too far off from a taste I’ve had my whole life for small things and for paper crafting. Although the paper crafting has never really extended farther than crafting small things.

Let me rewind. Elementary school me is at a Scholastic Book Fair. I find a pop and assemble miniature funky girl bedroom book. It came with glue, ribbon, beads and pages and pages of furniture pieces to make hot pink and purple, with yellow accent, mini bedroom furniture. The nightstand even had working cardstock drawers with bead pulls. I’ve looked for that book in more recent years and can’t find any record of it. I even reached out to Scholastic, but they don’t keep record of old stock.

Read more

TCA Train Show

I go to the annual train show almost every year here in Jacksonville, FL. It’s a big to do, held at a convention center, and has a ton of vendors. I tend to get pretty good deals as I’m looking for things the average train collector might not covet. I don’t have a train set, just a passion, and artistic use, for tiny things.

Read more

When Life Gets in the Way, Revel in All the Miniatures Around You

Life

Traveling for work, preparing for a move, planning a wedding, all while trying to keep up art motivation has been trying. That said, I’m still buzzing with ideas, but creating when I’m more in the mood for relaxing leads to half hearted photos that don’t match the vision in my head.

Instead I’ve been reading fiction and memoirs, rather than reading for research, watching movies, spending time with family and truly basking in the life I have around me. Allowing myself the space to breathe, and not stress about not living up to social media posting standards and my own harsh criticism of my artistic practice, has given me time to find fulfillment in other things, and to form new artistic ideas. Read more

Crop of What We Keep book cover

What We Keep by Bill Shapiro and Naomi Wax, A Reflection

“What makes these objects so evocative for us is that they hold the memories of people, of relationships, of places and moments and milestones that speak to our own identity.”

We like to criticize consumer culture, and with good reason. But as with everything, there is also good that comes with inanimate objects. A finding of ones self through the clothes we wear, collecting memories through the trinkets we keep, and seeking solace through the items of a loved one. Items are icons through which we frame our world.

What We Keep is a collection of 150 stories about well, what we keep. Each page delves into the sentimental, first hand account of a different person, from celebrities and CEOs to food truck owners and nurses, along with an image of their object. And it truly does an amazing job of showing just how emotional we as humans are, and how important tokens of remembrance become in that emotional way of living.

The items this book makes you consider of your own, and the intimate stories from others, make you feel a connection to some thing, someone, some experience.

Read more

In Miniature by Simon Garfield book cover

In Miniature by Simon Garfield, A Review

“We bring things down to size to understand and appreciate them.”

In Miniature: How Small Things Illuminate the World comes to us from Simon Garfield , a journalist and non-fiction author, who writes on a variety of topics.

In Miniature is a deep dive into the significant miniatures of history, organized into chapters by miniature type.

Read more

Photo Focus: The Effectiveness of Blur in Toy Photography

I recently picked up ‘Why It Does Not Have to be in Focus: Modern Photography Explained” by Jackie Higgens, on recommendation from a toy photo friend. Within it’s pages, Higgins offers short conclusions on the photographic genres – portraits, document, still life, narrative, landscape and abstract, followed by numerous examples. This allows the book to be read in short chunks, rather than as a whole, if desired.

While, to be clear, in large, the example images in this book are not literally blurry. Instead, they blur the lines of presumed photographic proof. That being said, literal blurred images serve the same means. As Higgins asserts, this figurative or literal blur creates mystery, conceals truth, insists on a different way of engaging with what is before us, and allows for the limits of photography to be challenged.

Read more

Welcome to Marwen

Returning to Welcome to Marwen

A new look at Welcome to Marwen with the recent US & UK DVD releases. Read about my movie theater experience here.

Welcome to Marwen (2018) is a Robert Zemeckis movie based on the true story of Mark Hogancamp. Having already seen the documentary Marwencol (2010), I already knew the following about Mark and his incredible life story, which provided a useful foundation for this movie.

Mark Hogancamp is a hate crime survivor. He mentioned he likes wearing women’s shoes while drinking at a bar, and in return got jumped from behind by five guys. They beat him nearly to death, putting him in a coma for nine days. When he regained consciousness, Mark had no memory of his prior life and had to relearn to write, speak, and walk again.

His state funding for medical care soon ran out, so he turned to a miniature world for his own version of therapy. His hands were too shaky for smaller scale models so, at the suggestion of a local hobby shop owner, he settled on 1:6 scale (think Barbie and GI Joe) and created the fictional Belgian town of ‘Marwencol’, circa World War II.

Read more